Marrital dating

Couples who meet online and get married are slightly less likely to divorce than couples who first meet face-to-face, new research finds.The study, a generally representative look at American couples married between 20, found that virtual meetings are becoming more of a norm: More than a third of married couples in that time met on the Internet.Meetings matter To find out whether meeting place influences the marriage in the long term, Cacioppo and his colleagues analyzed divorces, separations and marital satisfaction among their participants.They found that divorce and separation were slightly higher in those who met offline, with 7.6 percent of that group split up compared with 5.9 percent of those who met online.

But the researchers did suggest a few possibilities.

You ended up marrying your best friend's cousin or your golf buddy's wife's friend.

These days, thanks to technology, many more of us end up paired up with people who were perfect strangers before some algorithm brought them to our attention.

Online romance In their survey of 19,131 people (just one person from each married couple participated), Cacioppo and his colleagues found 92 percent were still married in 2012, 7.44 percent were separated or divorced and about 0.5 percent were widowed.

Of the approximately one-third of married couples who met online, 45 percent met on online dating sites (the most popular were e Harmony and Match.com, which were responsible for half of the dating-site matches).

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    Perhaps it was a matter of economics or perhaps it was a matter of pride and belief in American know-how which kept manufacturers from using the Codd method.